IMPACT OF A CHANGE IN POSITION ON JOB SATISFACTION

As an appendix to the 2011 survey on salaried engineers, we wanted to measure the impact of a change in employment on the various aspects of engineering work. We compared job satisfaction between those who had changed positions and those who had not.
 

WORK RELATIONS

A grade of 8.3/10 was given regardless of whether there had been a change of position. We haven't observed any difference caused by the motive for changing positions. People who now hold a position in a different company graded at 8.4/10 and those who changed jobs within the same company or due to a reorganization, closure or sale graded at 8.3/10. 

Work relationships were rated as more satisfying when the person moved to a position with increased responsibility (8.4/10) or stayed at the same level (8.4/10). However, when a position with less responsibility was taken, the rating dropped to 7.6/10.
 

RELATIONSHIP WITH IMMEDIATE SUPERVISOR

Persons who changed positions gave a grade of 8.2/10 compared to those who stayed in the same position, who gave a grade of 7.9/10. Among people who changed jobs, the grades were similar whether they changed companies (8.2/10), stayed at the same company (8.1/10) or changed jobs due to a reorganization, closure or sale (8.2/10).

Relationships with immediate supervisors were rated as more satisfying when the person moved to a position with increased responsibility (8.2/10) or stayed at the same level (8.3/10). However, when a position with less responsibility was taken, the rating dropped (7.3/10).

Working conditions including length of work week, annual vacations and benefits

A similar grade was given regardless of whether there had been a change of position (7.7/10) or not (7.6/10). People who voluntarily changed jobs (7.8/10) were more satisfied with their working conditions than people who changed jobs due to reorganization, closure or sale (7.3/10).

Working conditions were rated as more satisfying when the person moved to a position with increased responsibility (7.8/10) or stayed at the same level (7.8/10). However, when a position with less responsibility was taken, the rating dropped (7.4/10).
 

SENSE OF FULFILLMENT AT WORK

People who changed jobs were more enthusiastic about their sense of fulfillment at work (7.8/10) but were less enthusiastic when they had a position with a lower level of responsibility (7.4/10). Among those who changed jobs, people who changed companies (8/10) reported being more fulfilled than those stayed with the same company (7.8/10) and even more so than those who changed positions due to a reorganization, a closure or a sale (7.5/10).

The sense of fulfillment varied strongly between whether the person now held a position with increased responsibility (8.2/10), the same level (7.7/10) or less (6.3/10).
 

SATISFACTION WITH SALARY

People who changed jobs were more enthusiastic about their new salary (7.4/10) than those who stayed in the same position (7.0/10). Satisfaction with salary was similar in engineers who changed companies (7.6/10) and those who remained within the same company (7.5/10). However, this dropped significantly when the change in job was brought about by reorganization, closure or a sale (6.8/10).

Engineers who now hold a position with increased responsibility (7.6/10) were more satisfied with their salary, followed by people with the same level of responsibility (7.3/10) and then those who had jobs with lower levels of responsibility (7.0/10). 
 

ENCOURAGEMENT AND EVALUATIONS RECEIVED

People who changed jobs were more satisfied with this aspect (7.5/10) than those who stayed in the same position (7.0/10). The increase in satisfaction is slightly higher in people who moved to a new company (7.6/10) than those who remained with the same employer (7.3/10) and those who left their position due to a reorganization, closure or sale (7.4/10).

Engineers who now hold a position with increased responsibility (7.5/.10) or the same level (7.6/10) were equally satisfied with the encouragement and evaluations they received, which is not the case for those who moved to positions with less responsibility (6.3/10).
 

POSSIBILITY OF ADVANCEMENT

A change in employment contributed significantly to job satisfaction. People who changed jobs gave a rating of 7.4/10 and people who stayed in the same position gave it 6.6/10. The increase in satisfaction is slightly higher in people who moved to a new company (7.6/10) than those who remained with the same employer (7.3/10) and those who left their position due to a reorganization, closure or sale (7.0/10).

Satisfaction increased with the level of responsibility for new positions: 6.2/10 for positions with reduced responsibility, 7.2/10 for positions with the same level of responsibility and 7.7/10 for positions with increased responsibility.
 

OVERALL JOB SATISFACTION

Despite the fact that engineers who hadn't changed positions negatively noted aspects of their work, they rated only two tenths of a point less overall than those who had changed positions (7.7/10 versus 7.9/10). 

Overall satisfaction with work was similar in engineers who changed companies (8.0/10) and those who remained within the same company (7.9/10). However, this dropped slightly when the change in job was brought about by reorganization, closure or a sale (7.6/10).

Overall job satisfaction increased with the level of responsibility for new positions: 6.7/10 for positions with reduced responsibility, 7.8/10 for positions with the same level of responsibility and 8.1/10 for positions with increased responsibility. 
 

CONCLUSION

People who changed jobs were more satisfied with the majority of factors. We saw little difference in the degree of satisfaction regardless of whether they had changed companies. However, the satisfaction rate decreased depending on whether the respondent held a job with higher, the same or reduced responsibility. 

A change of employment and having new challenges equates heavily with job satisfaction. One of the negative aspects uncovered in light of our findings is that being forced to leave a position equates with not having sufficient leverage to conduct a successful negotiation.